National Parks in Scandinavia

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The Scandinavian region has many national parks, each with its own claim to unique native flora and fauna.

Denmark’s parks are very new – the first opened in 2008 – and contain small but unique environments such as the tidal flats of the Wadden Sea.

Parks in the other Scandinavian countries tend to be much bigger, with marked trails. In the more remote parks, you’ll often find a chain of mountain stations set a day’s walk from one another along waymarked footpaths, providing shelter for walkers. Most are equipped with cooking facilities, a shop and comfortable beds. Some have a self-service restaurant and a sauna.

Wadden Sea National Park, Denmark
Wadden Sea National Park, Denmark

They are not hotels, but simple accommodation designed to provide a haven at the end of the day for tired walkers.

Åmotdal Cabin, Norway
Åmotdal Cabin, Norway

Large areas of Norway have been designated as national parks to protect special habitats and support biodiversity.

Jostedals Glacier, Norway
Jostedals Glacier, Norway

Sweden’s 28 national parks cover everything from low-lying marshland to Sarek’s trackless mountains and glaciers.

Sarek National Park, Sweden

For spring flowers and birdsong, head to Dalby Söderskog in Skåne.

Dalby Söderskog, Sweden
Dalby Söderskog, Sweden

Store Mosse in Småland is worth a detour for birdwatchers interested in whooper swans, marsh harriers and cranes.

Whooper Swans, Photo: David Fyles
Whooper Swans, Photo: David Fyles

In Sweden and Norway, the extensive networks of walking and hiking trails are marked by a red “T”.

020816-hiking-in-norway
National Parks in Scandinavia, written by Tor Kjolberg

Feature image (on top) Huldrefossen (Wood Nymph Waterfall)

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